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Getting Tested and Treated for Strep Throat in New Port Richey

Getting Tested and Treated for Strep Throat in New Port Richey

Getting Tested and Treated for Strep Throat in New Port Richey

Bacterial infections can present themselves as scary, especially if you have no prior experience with the symptoms. Signs of strep throat, for instance, often include severe sore throat, redness on the interior of the throat with rough white patches, swollen tonsils and feelings of a closed throat, difficulty swallowing food or drinking liquids, and symptoms of a severe cold, like high fevers, chills, and headaches. While some symptoms vary in severity from one person to the next, strep throat can be a dangerous bacterial infection if left untreated. It can cause damage to your tonsils, the tissue in your throat, and your vocal cords, leading to worse complications over time. For that reason, you should opt for testing and treatment at Polmed Primary Care & Walk-in Clinic in New Port Richey if you feel what could be the first symptoms of strep throat.

Treatment for strep throat is usually rest, hydration, and antibiotics. However, the dosage of antibiotics depends on the severity of the illness. Young children and older adults risk developing severe strep throat symptoms because of weaker immune systems. They will require stronger doses and longer action plans for antibiotics.

How Long Does Strep Throat Take to Go Away?

Strep throat usually goes away within a week of proper treatment with strong antibiotics. The incubation period of strep throat is 2 to 5 days, so patients are the most contagious and should avoid contact with others. Patients can remain contagious for up to three weeks if left untreated before symptoms subside.

Head to Polmed Primary Care for Strep Throat Diagnosis and Treatment!

Polmed Primary Care & Walk-in Clinic is an expert in testing and treatments after your first symptoms of strep throat. Locate us in the New Port Richey facility or call (727) 339-2054.

Same Day check-in available

We speak: English, Polish, Hungarian, and Khmer ( Cambodian)